Friday, May 13, 2016

FLASHBACK: Fundraising Ideas For Dorchester Improvements


(The following article and comments were published in July 2008.)

Almost any Dorchester resident can name a project or two that would improve the quality of life in our community.

In a Times' poll conducted last month, 62 percent of respondents said improving Dorchester's streets is the community's most immediate need. 

Other projects cited in the Times' survey included improving the town water system; enhancing the appearance of main street; and making needed repairs and upgrades at the ball field.

The problem, of course, is how to pay for such efforts?

We are all aware of the economic downturn plaguing the United States and most of the rest of the world.  This has made some belt tightening necessary for the average American.

But does that mean we should halt all community improvement efforts? 

There are options for raising revenue. Back in March, we explored options to pay for street paving. The most viable option -- raising property taxes via bonding -- isn't appealing.

So today we are asking readers for their ideas on how best to raise the funds to pay for Dorchester's most needed improvement projects?

We, along with Dorchester's civic and government leaders, look forward to hearing from you.

16 comments:

  1. You can raise a lot of money on the good will of citizens. Just ask the Salvation Army. Put a welded iron kettle in the grocery store, bar, car wash, co-op, etc. and let people know exactly what the money would be used for (streets, water, etc.) In a year's time the city would have a nice supplemental cash fund just from people's spare change.

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  2. You can raise a lot of money on the good will of citizens. Just ask the Salvation Army. Put a welded iron kettle in the grocery store, bar, car wash, co-op, etc. and let people know exactly what the money would be used for (streets, water, etc.) In a year's time the city would have a nice supplemental cash fund just from people's spare change.

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  3. The answer is blowin' in the wind ... just like dust off the streets of Dorchester. All the city boys need to do is place a $5/day tax on vehicles that are inoperatable or haven't been moved in 30 days. (To determine this, just inspect the grass growing higher than the bumper like my neighbor's vehicle.)

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  4. Give to the dorchester community foundation!!!!

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  5. Joyce K said....

    Thanks CJ!! Upcoming projects for the Foundation will include Dorchester "Welcome" signs and the memorial marker for Mr. Havlat. We would welcome and appreciate new members, ideas and donations. Donations can be earmarked for whatever you wish -- such as: welcome signs, memorial marker, scholarships, mainstreet improvements, etc. -- $$$ stay with the NE Community Foundation (earning interest) until utilized.

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  6. Are the cub scouts & girl scouts still around? Groups like that should be more involved in helping raise funds for community projects I say!

    For the Dorchester ball park, just start charging a modest admission fee at the games to pay for improvements. $1 for kids over 12 and $2 for adults.

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  7. with the way the economy and gas prices are going, someone should put some of this money back to pay for the bills that are coming.

    Starting new building projects at this time that will raise taxes is about as crazy as you can get.

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  8. Put an extra 50 cent fee on every beer, lottery ticket and pack of cigaretts sold. If people are going to throw their money away anyway we may as well put some of it to a good cause.

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  9. Set up a dunking tank. Let each town council member set in the chair. Charge a dollar a throw. A hundred dollar fine for the council member that does not participate. A well publicised two hour session per member ought to generate a few dollars and a lot of fun.

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  10. I don't agree at all with the comment above. I don't want to dunk people who volunteer for their town even if I disagree with them at times. I would much rather dunk (for long lengths of time) individuals who sue community groups and work against the community as a whole.

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  11. How about a fine for all the illegal activities that go on in the community.

    The illegal use of 4 wheelers on city streets, the illegal use of golf carts on city streets, the illegal use of these vehicles by underage individuals, the illegal raising of livestock in city limits, and many other activites that are going on.
    Start fining these people and use this money to pave our streets.

    Everyone has an answer, lets see who gets results.

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  12. To add to Joyce K.'s post. The trailer at the park continues to collect aluminum cans. Since the Foundation is no longer collecting money for the park the money raised will go into the Foundation coffers for quarterly dues to the NE Foundation or another project. So if you're throwing your cans in the trash or sending them to recycling consider dumping them in the red trailer. Also, Larry Kaspar has been given 2 tickets to the NE vs MO football game (Oct 4th) by Senator Karpisek to raffle off to raise money for the Havlet memorial. Larry or most Foundation members have those tickets to sell ($1.00 each). Thanks for doing what you can to support the Foundation.

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  13. Here's a no-brainer: Charge more than $25 for use of the community building.

    Saturday night saw another illegal immigration fest. The abuse to the public facilities far exceeds the $25 rent fee that the city charges.

    $125 would be a good starter amount.

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  14. Along with the use of the community foundation as a mechanism to leverage funding, I suggest talking with Lindsay Papenhausen, Coordinator of the Community Development Assistance Act (CDAA)through the NE Dept of Economic Development.

    This is a relatively easy program that offers a 40% tax CREDIT to businesses and individuals that contribute to an approved CDAA project. The contribution can be monetary, or can also be contributions of services or materials.

    If you donate $100 to a project, when you fill out your NE tax return there is a CDAA line that you can apply you $40 credit too. This only works for those that pay in.

    The project must approved for CDAA prior to beginning of it.

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  15. raising the rent on the Community Center would be an excellent start. That is about what it was 35 - 40 years ago when I was on the board. Jim Sehnert

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  16. I believe that an increase in the community center rent and a small admission fee to games would be a good start towards raising money for the community.

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